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Blog, France

24 hours in Marseille

August 18, 2018
Marseille, Provence

Marseille has a reputation for being a little gritty, a little unsafe, a little unrefined, a little brutalist.  Not worth going to according to many, especially compared to some of the more attractive neighbouring cities and towns, like Aix en Provence, Montpelier and Nice.  And yet France’s second largest city has always intrigued me, perhaps since it came on my radar when it surprisingly became the European City of Culture in 2013.  Or perhaps even as early as 2012, when I read Mama Shelter had opened there.

So when an opportunity to arose to spend 24 hours here (it was actually a little less), I jumped at it.  And came away so grateful I did.  Marseille is without a doubt one of the coolest cities I’ve visited in a long time, with each of its districts so utterly contrasting you practically feel like you’re in a different city.  It has it all: art and culture (with contemporary art leading the way), a diverse mixture of architecture, a bustling, revived port, fabulous shopping and interesting restaurants.  It has heaps of atmosphere, life and soul.

MarseilleMarseille

Here are my top recommendations for a (very worthwhile) weekend in Marseille:

SLEEP

Mama Shelter

64 Rue de la Loubière, 13006 Marseille

Philip Starck designed, modern, quirky, fun.  At worst (and perhaps unfairly) it could be described as a five star hostel – not that there are any shared dorms or bathrooms – but more for the brilliant communal areas, designed for people to mix and meet and have fun.  The guests are impossibly trendy, young couples mostly.  On the weekend DJs play, there is great bar, a 4 metre long table football game, affordable drinks, an apparently incredible Sunday Brunch.  The staff are all smiles and so welcoming you start to question whether you’re in France.  The rooms vary in size (and price) but even our room (the Snug, the smallest) was immaculate, functional, comfortable but still felt like a treat.  Starck quirks like Sylvester and Batman masks hang from the wall; fun is encouraged at all times.  The price point feels impossibly low, I paid 80 euros for a night (without breakfast).  5/5

Mama Shelter, MarseilleMama Shelter, Marseille

Other recommended hotels (in order of cost) are Alex Hotel, C2 and the InterContinental (if you want something a little grander).

SEE

There is so much to see and do that we couldn’t fit it all in given the time we had. Must the must-dos are:

  • Mucem – the Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations. Extraordinary not just because of it’s incredible architecture – unusual, eye-catching, photogenic – but also because of the exhibitions it has (when we were there Ai Wei Wei was exhibiting).  But even if art isn’t your thing, make sure you walk through the museum and up to the top floor, from which you can access the fantastic roof terrace* (with brilliant views of the Cathedral and the port) and from there a metal bridge which links you directly with Le Fort Saint Jeanand the Old Port.

Mucem, Marseille

  • Marseille Cathedral – this beautiful Roman Catholic cathedral is a must visit, even if just from the outside.  Its black and white facade remind me a little of that of the cathedral in Orvieto, Italy, or even Siena.  It’s striking and stands out against the port, contrasting wonderfully with the Mucem in front of it.

Marseille Cathedral

  • The Old Port – Central to the city and completely restored in 2013, with the Notre Dame Cathedral overlooking high on a hill, this does truly feel like the heart of Marseille. From the fish market in the morning until the buskers in the evening, there is always something going on, always something to catch your eye, something to stir the imagination.

The Old Port, MarseilleThe Old Port, MarseilleThe Old Port, Marseille

  • Le Panier – Meaning ‘the basket’, this beautiful colourful ‘quarter’ is the oldest – and my favourite – part of Marseille.  It feels like you’re in a little village rather than a large city, with steep narrow twisting alleys, coloured shop fronts and sun drenched courtyards.  Yes, it’s a little touristy at parts, but that does not take away from the fact that it’s brilliant for shopping and small cafes, and for soaking up Marseille’s diverse cultural heritage.

Le Panier, MarseilleLe Panier, Marseille

  • Cours Julien and surroundings – If you stay at Mama Shelter, you’ll walk straight through the Cours Julien to the Old Port.  But even if you’re staying elsewhere, make sure you visit this bohemian quarter, teeming with life and dance and street art.  Known now as one of Marseille’s hippest areas with a mixture of designer boutiques, artist workshops and graffiti works of art, it’s brilliant fun to walk through and gives you a real taste of the city.

Cours Julien, Marseille

  • Le Fort Saint Jean – Best accessed as per the above. I loved the contrast of the old with the new of the Mucem right next door to Marseille’s fort, which was built in 1660 by Louis XIV.  The walk through the fort takes you through the history of Marseille (which is extensive) in a wonderful way.

EAT

Turns out the food in Marseille is rather good too.  While known for its traditional bouillabaise (which we never figured out how to pronounce), the food varies hugely depending on where you are in the city, with a good mix of French, North African and Sub-Saharan African food.  For brunch/lunch in and around the Old Port, either opt for Le Mole Cafe du Fort (more affordable) or Le Mole Passedat* (on the roof terrace of Mucem) run by famous French Michelin chef Gerard Passedat (see his restaurant options here).  For something more casual Victor Cafe and Le Petit Boucan are meant to be fun.  Close to Mama Shelter Coogee is meant to be great (especially for coffee) but it was shut for the summer when we were there, and  Le Fantastique looks wonderful too, with a lovely terrace.  If you’re looking for a coffee on the go, then grab one at Loustic.

For dinner you have tonnes of options, especially around the Port.  We had a romantic dinner at Cafe des Espices, slightly set back from the Port but on a fairy-light lit square surrounded by huge pots of olive trees.  The food and service were impeccable, and they served our favourite Chateau la Coste Rosé.  Other recommended restaurants in that area are Chez Fonfon (which specialises in bouillabaise), Chez Madie les Galinette.  A little further away but still on the sea front is Le Peron, which comes highly recommended.

Cafe des Espices, MarseilleLe Mole Passedat, Marseille

SHOP

I’m usually more of an online shopper than a window shopper – apart from the odd Zara/Mango splurge.  Marseille however, offers such fantastic shopping that even I couldn’t resist.  And I’m not just talking some of my favourite French brands like Maje, Sandro,  Claudie Pierot and Cottoniers des Comptoir, I highly recommend visiting the following concept/vintage/homeware/antique shops(and packing an extra suitcase):

  • Bazar du Panier – Who can resist a shopfront like this?  To be honest I loved all the little boutiques on the Rue du Panier, selling cotton dresses, tasseled pillows, straw bags and hats and colourful scarves.
  • Chez Lucas – Brilliant antique shop.  Was obsessed with a 1940s print of ‘Nationale Cigarette’ from the French Indochine days, but it was simply too huge to take with me.
  • Rita – A true concept store, with beautiful homeware, pretty clothes and a little coffee shop too.
  • La Maison Marseillaise – The ultimate homeware design boutique.
  • Bazardeluxe – Quite wanted to buy everything in this shop and ship it home with me.  I don’t recommend coming here at the start of your holiday with limited luggage space. I ended up buying six glasses (half price) for a bargain 16 euros, totally worth shlepping around the Provence for a week.
  • Allan Joseph – This shop was beautiful to walk through but equally painful when looking at the prices.  Stunning clothes, interiors and smell, but with the price point you’d expect from a shop selling Isabel Marant (i.e out of my budget).

Blog, Italy, Rome

Atelier Canova Tadolini, Rome – EAT

February 18, 2017
Museo Canova Tadolini, Rome

While I always try my hardest to be as ‘un-touristy’ as possible, especially when in Rome, where I like to consider myself almost a local (shame I don’t speak the language!), sometimes it’s quite fun to do something a little touristy and a little naff.

Having lunch at Atelier Canova Tadolini is one of these things worth doing.   We had a hilarious time, eating between the various classical busts and statues.  It was surprisingly quiet when we had lunch there, and made it almost feel like we had a private dining experience, were it for a charming French family who sat next to us.

Atelier Canova Tadolini, RomeAtelier Canova Tadolini, Rome

The staff were lovely, smiling at us as we took the mandatory photos of us having lunch.

And the food was surprisingly good.  I would stick to the ‘primi’ dishes – the pasta and risotto options – which were very rich but delicious.  I opted for the zucchini flower risotto which was a real hit, and my other favourite was the pecorino and black pepper home made pasta in the parmesan basket which is very typical of Rome.  The prices are also very reasonable.

Atelier Canova Tadolini, RomeAtelier Canova Tadolini, Rome

We left after a strong espresso to give us more energy to continue exploring the city.  While this isn’t on my top places to eat in Rome, I would recommend it, even if you just stop by for a coffee, because ultimately it is a fun and different experience.

Oh, and book ahead.

Ristorante Atelier Canova Tadolini

Via del Babuino 150/A

0039 632110702

Amsterdam, Blog, Stay, The Netherlands

Hotel Not Hotel, Amsterdam

September 22, 2015
Hotel Not Hotel, Amsterdam

If you’re going to stay in a quirky, creative, unusual hotel, it might as well be in Amsterdam.  For those of you looking for affordable and fun accommodation then Hotel Not Hotel is the place for you.  As we were in Amsterdam to see the fantastic contemporary photographic fair and festival UNSEEN, it seemed an apt place for us to stay.

Hotel Not Hotel, Amsterdam

There’s a strong hint in the name in terms of what you may, or may not, expect from Hotel Not Hotel.  This is a hotel, but it’s also a series of individual pieces of ‘art’ (in a loose sense of the word); where each room is different, no room is just a ‘room’.  It also has a few hostel-esque features, namely the shared bathrooms (which are very clean and modern) for some of the cheaper rooms, and a relaxed, laid back vibe.  But it’s far from a hostel.  The interiors are in fact, rather beautifully done.  I love the book cases doubling for doors to hidden rooms.  And the Mr and Mrs front doors leading to two rooms (one of which was ours for the night).  The crows nest and the tram cart are two other unique rooms.  It’s all well thought through and, even though it may not be for everyone, it is at least a very original idea.

Hotel Not Hotel, AmsterdamHotel Not Hotel, AmsterdamHotel Not Hotel, AmsterdamHotel Not Hotel, Amsterdam

They have a bar called Kevin Bacon.  While I’m not a massive fan of the actor, I thought the bar itself was rather beautiful.  It also has a small roadside terrace from which you can enjoy a morning coffee, or an early evening cocktail.

Hotel Not Hotel, AmsterdamHotel Not Hotel, Amsterdam

Bicycles are for rent, for €12 a day (and they’ll reserve them for you in advance).  We depended on this mode of transport throughout the weekend, and if you want to act like a local, then it’s key that you rent one too.  Then the hotel’s location – slightly out of the city centre, in bustling Amsterdam West – is not a problem either.  It takes 10 minutes max (depending on the calibre of the bikers you’re with) to cycle into the centre, or Amsterdam West has so many cosy neighbourhood cafes and bars (like Ted’s), as well as the brand new Cafe Panache, which seems to be the place to be for dinner on the weekend (blogs to follow on these).

Hotel Not Hotel, Amsterdam

Stay here for the experience, for a laugh.  It’s full of surprises.  Don’t take it too seriously, just enjoy it for what it is.  Then like us you’ll giggle when you wake up in a room which is not much bigger than a cupboard, looks like a chapel and is labeled ‘Crisis Free Zone’.  100% worth considering for a weekend away with friends.

Hotel Not Hotel, AmsterdamHotel Not Hotel, Amsterdam

For other Amsterdam accommodation ideas, consider the Volkshotel.  Plus sides is that it’s even more affordable than Hotel Not Hotel, has hot tubs on the roof, and a really fun bar.  Negatives are that it’s even further out of town.

Hotel Not Hotel

Piri Reisplein 34
1057 KH Amsterdam

Photos belong to Hotel Not Hotel

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